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Hollandale

I normally record with a set number of tunes, and I know them from start to finish. Here I started with a tuning, and maybe a couple of phrases, and then improvised the rest. I got into tight spots and worked my way out of them, and finished when I thought I was done.

Click HERE for Charlie's interview about Hollandale.
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Hollandale Reviews

"The sprightly music featured on Hollandale is driven forward by Parr's unique tunings on his Resonator and banjo, as the masterful musician crafts evocative story-lines in his songs even without singing a word." - City Pages Gimme Noise

"As fleeting, yet as timeless as the inspiration and images behind them, Charlie used his ability to see and transform any material, surroundings, and feeling into a musical voyage." - Music News Nashville

"With this job, there's no way to retire." - City Pages interview

"Charlie Parr has set the bar of creativity and originality that all folk, blues, and country musicians will be measured against throughout 2014 and beyond, and did what every musician would love to do 12 releases into their musical journey: make an impact larger than themselves. Two guns up." - Saving Country Music

"Hollandale lists five “songs” yet I hear this album as a whole, closer to a classical symphony or Coltrane’s A Love Supreme than anything that would be associated with the Piedmont style of blues he generally plays."
- Ninebullets.net

"Hey! I'm going to rave about Charlie Parr's new Hollandale. Have you heard it? You should. All those other six-stringers you've been spinning? Just put them aside for a bit and give your ears something a bit...tangy-er....to chew on. This is something you need to let yourself experience. Probably a bunch of times.

This is the all-instrumental set that Charlie's been thinking about for years and it's finally, finally ready -- primal, buckets-of-frozen-mud, man-wrestling-with-the-shadows-around-him, serious guitar- (and banjo-) slinging of the highest (which is to say also the lowest) order -- just something you need to slap on the turntable and try to wrap your head around. Spiritual warfare with a mean-sounding slide.

I'm proud to have played some music with Charlie over the years, and recorded him a couple of times, and to have a bit of an idea about how his take on sound works -- so take all this with whatever measure of salt you think appropriate. I'm calling Hollandale a big step forward, not just for Charlie but I think for anyone interested in reclaiming or maintaining some guts, some punch, some punch-in-the-guts, just some serious stomp in their acoustic guitar listening.

It's brawny. And fast. And not showy.

This is actually a duo album much of the time, with long-time comrade Alan Sparhawk painting such perfect bits of electric guitar drone and flurry into the blend that Charlie, who often sounds like he has three hands, seems to turn into some sort of octopus. Alan nails it.

I've said too much. But really, highest recommendation. Go check this out. You want to hear this." - Mike Gangloff (Pelt, Black Twig Pickers)

"It was not nice – it wasn’t like the friendly, happy Paul Bunyon. It was really a bad thing. It was scaring the crap out of me, and I was running through the woods trying to find a place that I could hide from this menacing lumberjack. I had told Alan about that dream, and it was on my mind when I was working out that particular tune. It’s in this banjo-inspired tuning from double C, you know, “C G C G C C”. It’s very drone-y. It’s more or less thinking about that bad dream." - Rochester Campus Times interview

"When I re-tuned my 12-string for example, to some of these tunings I wasn’t used to, I heard things happening that implied other things, and I found myself just kind of following—this is going to sound really hippie—I found myself kind of following the songs. If I got myself into funny corners, I’d just be patient and hang in there with it, and the funny corners would find a way to something that led out of it." - Arts Extract interview

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